The California Water Transfer plan.

A comprehensive approach to California’s long-term water supply.

There is a solution to the California water crisis. The California Water Transfer Plan provides an economically viable, environmentally sound alternative to existing proposals addressing water management and use.

Three of California’s most difficult water-related problems will be solved by enabling agriculture to access treated municipal recycled water:

1. There are 5 million acre-feet of recycled water available for use across the State.
2. 10% is currently being recycled. Four and a half million are being dumped.
3. 4,500,000 acre-feet of water could supply California’s agriculture industry year-round

4.5 million acre-feet
of recycled water =

$ 1,125,000,000.00 @ $350/acre foot

2,782,000 gallons / minute

Creation of a new, self-sustaining industry

The California Water Transfer Plan offers the following:

Water for agriculture

Supply agriculture with approximately 4,500,000 acre-feet of water annually.

Billions in new revenue

1 acre foot of water = $ 350.00, generating over $1.5 billion in new revenue for operational support

Water Transfer System

Utilize existing irrigation district canals for water conveyance.

Environmental Stability

Reduce depletion of natural water flows, encourage long-term ecological stability.

The plan proposes utilizing recycled municipal wastewater for agriculture. Currently there are approximately 5 million acre-feet of wastewater available for use statewide. According to the Davis Report, ten percent is being utilized in a secondary application. The remaining 4,500,000 acre-feet are discarded. With a market value of $350.00 per acre-foot, this translates into $1,575,000,000 dollars annually.

At a fraction of the cost associated with most plans and proposals currently being discussed, the CWTP is economically viable, requires minimal infrastructure modifications, provides for long-term revenue generation, and guarantees the continued vitality of California’s agriculture industry. Long –term gains begin with the stabilization of natural flows in waterways across the state providing for continued growth in other industries such as recreation and tourism.

Water Transfers

The State of California has a vast, functional, and accessible water conveyance system based on regional irrigation districts spanning most of the state and capable of connecting rural and urban areas. The interconnection and utilization of this existing system is the key to feasible and affordable implementation of a statewide water transfer program.

Recycled water can flow directly from the municipality to its nearest agricultural irrigation district. Excess water from one irrigation district can be conveyed to a neighboring one. Designated reservoirs would store water during non-irrigating seasons for use during periods of high demand.

Three of California’s most difficult water-related problems will be solved by enabling agriculture to access treated municipal wastewater:

1. Agricultural is guaranteed a reliable source of water year-round.

2. Natural water supplies can be conserved and allowed to return to normal flows without the negative impact of wastewater inflows.

3. Municipalities across the state have an affordable means of disposing of their tertiary-use water.

Ecological and Environmental Stability

Allow natural water flows to stabilize
Eliminate negative ecological effects of coastal dumping
Revitalization of recreation & tourism industries statewide

California Water Transfer Plan Accomplishments

Productive

Supply California’ agriculture with approximately 4,500,000 acre-feet of water annually

Self-sustaining

Generate $1.25 billion dollars for infrastructure modifications and operational support

Efficient

Reverse the traditional transfer of water from agriculture to municipality, utilizing existing irrigation district canals for water conveyance

Profitable

Create new source of revenue for municipalities

Stabilizing

Reduce depletion of natural water flows and encourage long-term stability

Responsible

Diminish ecological degradation of Pacific coastline and major waterways

Get In Touch

Contact us for more information:
707 217 8425 & gbr@rpandp.com

Gregory Ryan & Meagan R. Stasz, California Water Transfer Plan